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deworm the world

Worms Win, Kids Lose? Our Statement.

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Worms Win, Kids Lose? Our Statement.

The case for mass school-based deworming in endemic countries stands on two legs: First, the body of rigorous evidence that supports mass deworming as a cost-effective intervention. Second, mass treatment without first testing for infection is cheap, safe, and an efficient strategy for reaching lots of kids quickly. Claims in a recent paper by Calum Davey and colleagues and the Cochrane Review by members of the same research group that have been picked up in the press are based on flawed analysis, and could threaten an emerging public health success story.

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What Does it Take to Treat Millions of Kids? Partners, Speed, and A Willingness to Learn

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What Does it Take to Treat Millions of Kids? Partners, Speed, and A Willingness to Learn

What does it take to become a global leader in tackling debilitating parasitic worms in children?  Speed and willingness to learn from other countries who have already done it.

This is the story of Ethiopia where in January of this year, the Federal Ministry of Health announced a national school-based deworming program that will treat over 80% of at-risk children for parasitic worms (namely, soil-transmitted helminths and schistosomiasis) by 2020. In the course of the next five years, the Ministry of Health will collaborate with teachers and health extension workers to distribute over 100 million worm treatments to at-risk children in all corners of this vast country.

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Mass Deworming: It's Good Public Policy

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Mass Deworming: It's Good Public Policy

Intestinal worm infections are among the most widespread diseases globally today that affect more than a billion people especially in low-income countries. These parasites--roundworms, hookworms, and whipworms--affect especially school-age children, causing malnutrition, fatigue, and even organ damage and internal bleeding. Periodic and presumptive mass treatment of every child is inexpensive, considered very safe, and is recommended WHO policy in areas where worms are endemic. A number of countries have made school-based deworming part and parcel of their national health and education policies.

Yet, some have argued that the WHO recommendation of mass treatment of everyone in an affected area is not supported by enough evidence.

In a new paper, authors Amrita Ahuja, Sarah Baird, Michael Kremer et al. argue that mass deworming treatment is not only effective for children, supported by ample and growing rigorous evidence, but also smart educational and economic policy for endemic countries.

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Evidence Action Joins the STH Coalition

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Evidence Action Joins the STH Coalition

Evidence Action is pleased to announce that we have joined the STH Coalition, a new group of organizations focused on reducing the public health threat of soil-transmitted helminths (STH) worldwide. Soil-transmitted helminths --intestinal parasites such as roundworm, hookworm, and whipworm-- affect the health, education, and livelihoods of over one billion people worldwide. The World Health Organization has set a target of reaching 75% of all at-risk children by 2020; yet only 32% of children received deworming drugs in 2012. Given the magnitude and complexity of the challenge, we at Evidence Action believe that a cross-sectoral, collaborative approach to addressing STH is essential.

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The Evidence for Impacts of Deworming Grows

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The Evidence for Impacts of Deworming Grows

Evidence Action engages in a rigorous and systematic approach to identify development interventions that we can turn into programs that benefit millions of people with real and proven results. That is what sets us apart from most global development organizations. All programs that we undertake have a strong evidence base generated from peer-reviewed, rigorous evaluations that demonstrate a clear causal chain, most often in the form of randomized control trials (RCTs). 

Evidence Action engages in a rigorous and systematic approach to identify development interventions that we can turn into programs that benefit millions of people with real and proven results. That is what sets us apart from most global development organizations. All programs that we undertake have a strong evidence base generated from peer-reviewed, rigorous evaluations that demonstrate a clear causal chain, most often in the form of randomized control trials (RCTs).

Evidence Action’s Deworm the World Initiative is a good example of a program that is bolstered by a well-rounded and very strong evidence base that highlights the positive impacts of mass deworming on children’s cognition and education across diverse settings.

And now there is new evidence that further supports that mass deworming works and even has long-term effects.

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Full Transparency: Deworm the World Initiative's Grant from Good Ventures

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Full Transparency: Deworm the World Initiative's Grant from Good Ventures

Good Ventures provided $1.5 million to Deworm the World Initiative at Evidence Action, based on GiveWell’s recommendation of Deworm the World as a top charity for 2013. These funds were donated by Good Ventures to “cover around 75% of the minimum level of funding that GiveWell would like to see its recommended charities raise during the 2013 giving season.”  

In the spirit of openness and transparency that GiveWell practices, the purpose of this blog post is to share how we are deploying the Good Ventures grant resources. 

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